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  #1  
Old January 17th, 2012, 06:25 PM
Dayenu Dayenu is offline
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Question I thought, there is a law to have 100% lifeboat capacity - NO!

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012...?newsfeed=true

"maritime law only requires lifeboat capacity for 75% of passengers – 50% in traditional boats hanging off the side, 25% in inflatables on board"

Why did I think it's 100% capacity?
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  #2  
Old January 17th, 2012, 07:41 PM
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gma_pat gma_pat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayenu View Post
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012...?newsfeed=true

"maritime law only requires lifeboat capacity for 75% of passengers – 50% in traditional boats hanging off the side, 25% in inflatables on board"

Why did I think it's 100% capacity?

http://www.hickeylawfirm.com/pdf/uscg.pdf

Us Coast Guard Consumer Fact Sheet " passengers need not be alarmed if they discover that the total number of person's on board ... exceeds the total capacity of the ship's life boats... the total capacity of all the survival craft on board will exceed the total number of persons on the vessel" bottom page 1 top 2.... Interesting read!
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Last edited by gma_pat; January 17th, 2012 at 07:43 PM.
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  #3  
Old January 17th, 2012, 08:29 PM
John Bull John Bull is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayenu View Post
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012...?newsfeed=true

"maritime law only requires lifeboat capacity for 75% of passengers – 50% in traditional boats hanging off the side, 25% in inflatables on board"

Why did I think it's 100% capacity?
Sloppy research by the Guardian newspaper, and not for the first time .

Capacity is a minimum 100% under SOLAS regulations.
A minimum 75% must be in lifeboats, the remaining 25% can be in liferafts.
50% of this capacity on each side
These figures include all on board, passengers and crew.

SOLAS is an internationally-recognised standard, and ships would not be permitted to operate in the developed world without SOLAS certification.

See page 3 on http://www.imo.org/OurWork/Safety/Re...viving.FIN.pdf

JB
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  #4  
Old January 18th, 2012, 02:59 AM
BruceMuzz BruceMuzz is offline
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Next time you board a ship's tender boat, take a good look at the rating of the boat, posted on a placard inside, or stenciled on the outside.

Most tender boats today claim a capacity of 200 passengers.
Then take a look at the people sitting around you.
Most are in the 250 pound range - and up.
Count the heads in a very crowded tender boat and you might see as many as 75.
There is no way the boat can accommodate even 100 of these grossly overfed people.

Forget the 200 passenger capacity sign - and hope for 100.
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  #5  
Old January 18th, 2012, 01:32 PM
PennyAgain PennyAgain is offline
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Default certainly!

Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceMuzz View Post
Next time you board a ship's tender boat, take a good look at the rating of the boat, posted on a placard inside, or stenciled on the outside.

Most tender boats today claim a capacity of 200 passengers.
Then take a look at the people sitting around you.
Most are in the 250 pound range - and up.
Count the heads in a very crowded tender boat and you might see as many as 75.
There is no way the boat can accommodate even 100 of these grossly overfed people.

Forget the 200 passenger capacity sign - and hope for 100.
And add to that the people who are disabled and need assistance getting to and on to a lifeboat, and the situation is not so pretty.
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